It's coming together

Getting busy

spring 2019

getting ready to show you all. I have so many patterns that have gone unmade and they are so good! Now that the babes are beyond tiny baby and Im no longer working mornings at Lucia's Waldorf school, I can safely say that it is time to get these samples into the world and make market happen. 

 field dress in lavender-maybe will be a touch darker..xo

field dress in lavender-maybe will be a touch darker..xo

New Mexico with my babes

It's cold, it's sometimes rainy and I miss my friends. We miss each other. So Jean suggests a "meet in the middle" type affair. Santa Fe? Some family friends have a house we might be able to use. So we do it, in the midst of having families, businesses and general chaos. And it's lovely. Inspiration is in abundance in the high desert-the light, the adobe, and of course the rich textile and folk art history. Natacha lets me snap a few pictures of her in some upcoming LR pieces and the girls get to try on some jumpsuits. The feedback is so helpful coming from these women. Thanks.

 Land of awesome old trucks

Land of awesome old trucks

 Shiprock, Santa Fe. Old Navajo blankets

Shiprock, Santa Fe. Old Navajo blankets

 More blankets. Shiprock, Santa Fe

More blankets. Shiprock, Santa Fe

 Katchina shadow dancing at the house

Katchina shadow dancing at the house

chicktrip.jpg

cochineal for the pinks

I have a long-standing fascination with the cochineal bug-pretty little silver mamas that yield vibrants reds, purples and pinks.

 handful of the lady bugs

handful of the lady bugs

I personally love the pinks and purples which in my experience are the easiest to achieve-no cream of tartar, chalk, etc. Just an alum bath, time in the buggy pot and a nice wash-perfect. I have learned that one must filter all the bits and pieces out to get the best, or clearest, results. But if one is going for the purple blotches on purple, then don't bother filtering-it's all beautiful. 

 ground bugs become a fine powder

ground bugs become a fine powder

 bug juice. aka-dye

bug juice. aka-dye

 mix of cotton rope and cotton scarf

mix of cotton rope and cotton scarf

I like to use exhaust baths with other dyes to see what colors are achievable. It's not a scientific way to create color because of the inconsistencies but for one-offs, its a great way to eliminate waste. reuse reuse reuse, right??

Cellulose fibers, aka plant-based, could use a chalk afterbath to create bright, clear colors. While I love some bright jewel tones I LOVE dusty, muted tones. Below is an example of woven cotton and linen (top). Cellulose fibers in general need more dye than their animal counterparts. 

 these scarves are dyed with both cochineal and madder root

these scarves are dyed with both cochineal and madder root

Peace, love and dye on!